Using Design Thinking in Everyday Life

Have you come across this quarantine meet-cute between a guy and a girl from Brooklyn? Where the guy saw this cute girl dancing on the roof of her building, liked what he saw, and waved at her. Wonder of wonders, she waved back at him. The only problem? They were both quarantined in the city of New York and there was no way to meet each other in person. But as the saying goes, modern problems need modern solutions. Which is why our love-struck fella took his drone and attached a note to it with his contact details asking the girl to text him. The girl got the note via the drone, they exchanged texts, and that’s how it started. The man in question, Jeremy Cohen speaking about his unique experience said, “I think I was just craving some social interaction, and being confined by the walls of my apartment inspired some creativity for me.” See what out-of-the-box thinking can get you? Problems are an integral part of our journey as humans. However, there are few among us who actually take a concentrated effort to get down to the root of those problems. The usual route taken involves a quick-fix solution, only to have the problem rear its ugly head back at us in due time. Is there a way out? Yes, there is, and the key to it lies in the design thinking philosophy — a mindset that designers have been using to create memorable products at Apple, Nike, and yes, even Google. Becoming a Better Problem Solver with Design Thinking SourceDesign Thinking is an iterative process that involves understanding the problem, challenging assumptions about it, and identifying multiple strategies and solutions that might resolve it for good. It is essentially a solution-based approach to solving problems. I’m sure you’re itching to know what’s so unique about it that non-designers need to adopt it. Well, it is a problem-solving technique that uses logic, intuition, and systematic reasoning to develop long-term solutions. And if that doesn’t convince you, know that products like the iPhone, AirBnB, and Uber are all results of a bunch of designers applying the tenets of Design Thinking. While it is mainly used by designers as a technique, its tenets can help anyone to get on course with solving problems creatively. Let’s get started with the most important one - Jumping to solutions isn’t really a workout SourceEarlier this week, Twitter was the battleground between the British Home Secretary Priti Patel and ice cream major Ben & Jerry’s on the migrant issue, after she pledged to make these dangerous crossings “unviable,” Here’s what Ben & Jerry’s had to say, in this thread. “Hey @PritiPatel we think the real crisis is our lack of humanity for people fleeing war, climate change and torture”. So you see, when faced with a problem, our immediate reaction is to solve it. Sadly enough, this is what leads to half-baked solutions — quite like slapping a Band-Aid on a deep wound. Or, arbitrarily announcing migrant crossings as “unviable”, instead of identifying the root cause. Solutions that offer fleeting relief never really work out in the long run. The Design Thinking philosophy stresses the importance of understanding the problem thoroughly, before contemplating a solution. This ensures that the problem-solving moves in the right direction and meets the right end. As tempted as you might be to slap on that Band-Aid, take time out to first study the nature of the injury, what caused it, and you’re sure to come up with better ways to heal it. The first decent idea shouldn’t be your last SourceHenry Ford was known to have said, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said ‘faster horses.’’’ As tempted as you may be to follow the first idea (solution) that pops in your head, impulsiveness may not get you the desired result. Exploration is at the heart of Design Thinking, and it provides for a much better resolution. By pushing your mind to look for multiple solutions, you are exploring various ways in which to best solve your issue. Basically, you would be looking at uplifting the level of your solution from mediocre to worthy. Let’s say you’re looking to create a sustainable lifestyle. The first idea you might get is to stop using plastics. Good enough. But as you proceed, you may realize that a life that is 100% sans plastic is never truly feasible, which can cause some demotivation. Instead, you could list out multiple ways of living a sustainable life — planting more trees, using public transportation, cooking your own meals, and more. This not only keeps you on track but ensures that you fulfill your goal in a wholesome manner. Assumptions are your windows. Scrub them to let the light in. It was Issac Asimov who said this, and it couldn’t be truer. As per the Oxford dictionary, an assumption is a thing that is accepted as true or as certain to happen, without proof. For instance, is it right to assume that the longer one stays in office, the more work gets accomplished? Is this true? Could be, could not! The approach to

Using Design Thinking in Everyday Life

Have you come across this quarantine meet-cute between a guy and a girl from Brooklyn? Where the guy saw this cute girl dancing on the roof of her building, liked what he saw, and waved at her. Wonder of wonders, she waved back at him. The only problem? They were both quarantined in the city of New York and there was no way to meet each other in person.

But as the saying goes, modern problems need modern solutions. Which is why our love-struck fella took his drone and attached a note to it with his contact details asking the girl to text him. The girl got the note via the drone, they exchanged texts, and that’s how it started.

The man in question, Jeremy Cohen speaking about his unique experience said, “I think I was just craving some social interaction, and being confined by the walls of my apartment inspired some creativity for me.”

See what out-of-the-box thinking can get you?

Problems are an integral part of our journey as humans. However, there are few among us who actually take a concentrated effort to get down to the root of those problems. The usual route taken involves a quick-fix solution, only to have the problem rear its ugly head back at us in due time.

Is there a way out? Yes, there is, and the key to it lies in the design thinking philosophy — a mindset that designers have been using to create memorable products at Apple, Nike, and yes, even Google.

Becoming a Better Problem Solver with Design Thinking

Source

Design Thinking is an iterative process that involves understanding the problem, challenging assumptions about it, and identifying multiple strategies and solutions that might resolve it for good. It is essentially a solution-based approach to solving problems.

I’m sure you’re itching to know what’s so unique about it that non-designers need to adopt it. Well, it is a problem-solving technique that uses logic, intuition, and systematic reasoning to develop long-term solutions. And if that doesn’t convince you, know that products like the iPhone, AirBnB, and Uber are all results of a bunch of designers applying the tenets of Design Thinking.

While it is mainly used by designers as a technique, its tenets can help anyone to get on course with solving problems creatively. Let’s get started with the most important one -

Jumping to solutions isn’t really a workout

Source

Earlier this week, Twitter was the battleground between the British Home Secretary Priti Patel and ice cream major Ben & Jerry’s on the migrant issue, after she pledged to make these dangerous crossings “unviable,” Here’s what Ben & Jerry’s had to say, in this thread.

“Hey @PritiPatel we think the real crisis is our lack of humanity for people fleeing war, climate change and torture”.

So you see, when faced with a problem, our immediate reaction is to solve it. Sadly enough, this is what leads to half-baked solutions — quite like slapping a Band-Aid on a deep wound. Or, arbitrarily announcing migrant crossings as “unviable”, instead of identifying the root cause.

Solutions that offer fleeting relief never really work out in the long run. The Design Thinking philosophy stresses the importance of understanding the problem thoroughly, before contemplating a solution. This ensures that the problem-solving moves in the right direction and meets the right end.

As tempted as you might be to slap on that Band-Aid, take time out to first study the nature of the injury, what caused it, and you’re sure to come up with better ways to heal it.

The first decent idea shouldn’t be your last

Source

Henry Ford was known to have said, “If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said ‘faster horses.’’’

As tempted as you may be to follow the first idea (solution) that pops in your head, impulsiveness may not get you the desired result. Exploration is at the heart of Design Thinking, and it provides for a much better resolution. By pushing your mind to look for multiple solutions, you are exploring various ways in which to best solve your issue. Basically, you would be looking at uplifting the level of your solution from mediocre to worthy.

Let’s say you’re looking to create a sustainable lifestyle. The first idea you might get is to stop using plastics. Good enough. But as you proceed, you may realize that a life that is 100% sans plastic is never truly feasible, which can cause some demotivation. Instead, you could list out multiple ways of living a sustainable life — planting more trees, using public transportation, cooking your own meals, and more. This not only keeps you on track but ensures that you fulfill your goal in a wholesome manner.

Assumptions are your windows. Scrub them to let the light in.

It was Issac Asimov who said this, and it couldn’t be truer.

As per the Oxford dictionary, an assumption is a thing that is accepted as true or as certain to happen, without proof. For instance, is it right to assume that the longer one stays in office, the more work gets accomplished? Is this true? Could be, could not!

The approach to question everything helps in breaking down preconceived notions, societal norms, and assumptions and finally gets you cracking some out-of-the-box ideas. You’d be amazed at how deep our social conditioning runs and the impact it has on the way we think and take decisions. Design Thinking helps you get out of those brackets by vetoing your assumptions against observations and facts.

What’s common between Nintendo, the Wheaties cereal, and Dyson Vacuums?

They’re all the result of persistence. In the words of Henry Ford again, “Failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently”.

You see, design is iterative — it is constantly churning out possible solutions, testing them for their viability, and returning to the drawing board in case of failures. Ever heard of ‘fail fast to learn faster’? Designers are comfortable with failure as long as they incorporate their learnings to come up with the next set of ideas. This mindset is unique to designers, and it can be helpful to everyone. There are times when we shy away from innovation solely because the risk of it falling flat is frightening. But, as long as you’re learning from the takeaways, nothing should stop you from experimenting. Keep this in mind when you’re contemplating learning a new language or trying out new cuisine, or even trying out a new venture.

Design Thinking involves creating an environment for yourself where you are not afraid of creating unique ideas, trying new things, and failing productively. Remember, Design Thinking is a mindset and culture. It is not to be treated as a mechanical process wherein you apply a set of steps to churn out innovative ideas.


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