Spending less time deciding what to wear — a UX case study

Spending less time deciding what to wear — a UX case study Illustration by Inked PencilIt’s 10:30 on a Wednesday morning, my zeal to go to work has diminished substantially, my lower back refuses to be at peace, and I am hardly able to pull myself up to get ready. Amidst of all these mixed emotions, a voice echoes in the back of my head, leaving me numb. “What do I wear today?”, it says. It’s 11:30 now and I’m late for work. Before you guys think why it matters during this pandemic and lockdown, just imagine this to be the year 2021. Let’s just skip to it…how I wish. Ok, just imagine a scenario where everything is normal. So, I’m leaving for work and I can’t take the image of the muddled wardrobe out of my head. I wasted so much time deciding what to wear, and now I have to spend more time organizing it back. Again. All because I didn’t know what exactly I was looking for. This is something a lot of people struggle with on a daily basis. Everyone, at some point in their lifetime, has forgotten what clothes they own or which ones are in the laundry. Someone gave me the idea of a mobile app which helps you decide what to wear. I related to this idea so much that I took it up as a personal project. Me, pretty much every morningWhy does it matter? Sociologists and psychologists have long recognized the influence of one’s appearance on important life experiences including interpersonal relationships and job-related successes. People dress up for: Social acceptance/Impressing people Standing out, or to make a statement Some dress for themselves(like me). Narcissistic much? But, that is more of a styling problem, going back to your taste and your dressing sense. We’re not trying to give you styling and shopping tips. We’re simply trying to: Save your time Keep you organized …by just bringing your existing wardrobe inside the app. I did a quick survey Since it was a personal project, I could only conduct the survey with a small sample size, but it was enough to give me actionable insights and back my ideas and decisions. It also helped in understanding the setting and context of use for the app which could be: While brushing your teeth Taking a dump Before or after shower Just after waking up…and so on. I conducted the survey with SurveyMonkeyInsights Value propositions Help you save time Make a choice that satisfies your mood Tell you exactly what to look for in your wardrobe Smart recommendations and assistance Don’t make you think too much Enter Nigel Nigel is a smart wardrobe assistant who helps you decide what to wear every day by telling you exactly what to look for in your wardrobe. It gives you smart suggestions so that you don’t have to think before looking. But to do so, it requires you to input your wardrobe data. For example, your t-shirts, shirts, trousers, etc. Once your online wardrobe is built, it automatically gathers all the data and starts suggesting combinations. This solves both your problems, deciding what to wear, and keeping your wardrobe organized. Why the name Nigel, you ask? Well…remember Nigel from The Devil Wears Prada? Need I say more? https://medium.com/media/15f27881fa8de53242ca6c5f8c8032e4/hrefI saw this film when I was in my undergrad, around 9 years back. We were told to study a film about fashion. I found Nigel’s character charming, trustworthy, and empathetic. Most importantly, he was good at his job. He turned Andrea’s life around when she was struggling with her dressing and survival in the Runway. So naturally, Nigel became the inspiration for Nigel. But wait, who’s gonna use it? Someone who doesn’t like wasting time but still likes to dress up — between productive, lazy, and/or workaholic. I quickly imagined a couple of personas who were most likely to use this app. Empathy Mapping Empathy Mapping — for better user understandingKey Features While brainstorming, ideas came gushing in. I wanted to keep it simple, rather than putting everything and making my life messier than my wardrobe. The idea was to keep the app effective and efficient. The key features were: Build your wardrobe Nigel assist/Changing room Move to/Remove from laundry Partywear Journey Map/Low-Fid Wireframes Now that I had more clarity on how I wanted Nigel to be, I laid out the flow of the app. To structure my ideas, I created low-fid wireframes and a journey map. Oh, and I used a really cool Figma plugin to make the wireframes. It was super quick and efficient. I could just drag and drop stuff in it. I used Overflow to make the journey map. Journey Map & Low-Fid WireframesVisualizing Nigel When the time came to give Nigel its identity, only a few keywords came to my mind: Minimal, Classy, Trustworthy, Poised, Calm, and Composed. Nigel’s IdentityColour Palette Colour PaletteTypography and Icon style Hi Nigel! What do I wear today? Nigel Assist This is a smart recommendation system that creates suitable patterns and combos based on your wardrobe and some intelligent factors. The factors are: Worn

Spending less time deciding what to wear — a UX case study
Spending less time deciding what to wear — a UX case study Illustration by Inked PencilIt’s 10:30 on a Wednesday morning, my zeal to go to work has diminished substantially, my lower back refuses to be at peace, and I am hardly able to pull myself up to get ready. Amidst of all these mixed emotions, a voice echoes in the back of my head, leaving me numb. “What do I wear today?”, it says. It’s 11:30 now and I’m late for work. Before you guys think why it matters during this pandemic and lockdown, just imagine this to be the year 2021. Let’s just skip to it…how I wish. Ok, just imagine a scenario where everything is normal. So, I’m leaving for work and I can’t take the image of the muddled wardrobe out of my head. I wasted so much time deciding what to wear, and now I have to spend more time organizing it back. Again. All because I didn’t know what exactly I was looking for. This is something a lot of people struggle with on a daily basis. Everyone, at some point in their lifetime, has forgotten what clothes they own or which ones are in the laundry. Someone gave me the idea of a mobile app which helps you decide what to wear. I related to this idea so much that I took it up as a personal project. Me, pretty much every morningWhy does it matter? Sociologists and psychologists have long recognized the influence of one’s appearance on important life experiences including interpersonal relationships and job-related successes. People dress up for: Social acceptance/Impressing people Standing out, or to make a statement Some dress for themselves(like me). Narcissistic much? But, that is more of a styling problem, going back to your taste and your dressing sense. We’re not trying to give you styling and shopping tips. We’re simply trying to: Save your time Keep you organized …by just bringing your existing wardrobe inside the app. I did a quick survey Since it was a personal project, I could only conduct the survey with a small sample size, but it was enough to give me actionable insights and back my ideas and decisions. It also helped in understanding the setting and context of use for the app which could be: While brushing your teeth Taking a dump Before or after shower Just after waking up…and so on. I conducted the survey with SurveyMonkeyInsights Value propositions Help you save time Make a choice that satisfies your mood Tell you exactly what to look for in your wardrobe Smart recommendations and assistance Don’t make you think too much Enter Nigel Nigel is a smart wardrobe assistant who helps you decide what to wear every day by telling you exactly what to look for in your wardrobe. It gives you smart suggestions so that you don’t have to think before looking. But to do so, it requires you to input your wardrobe data. For example, your t-shirts, shirts, trousers, etc. Once your online wardrobe is built, it automatically gathers all the data and starts suggesting combinations. This solves both your problems, deciding what to wear, and keeping your wardrobe organized. Why the name Nigel, you ask? Well…remember Nigel from The Devil Wears Prada? Need I say more? https://medium.com/media/15f27881fa8de53242ca6c5f8c8032e4/hrefI saw this film when I was in my undergrad, around 9 years back. We were told to study a film about fashion. I found Nigel’s character charming, trustworthy, and empathetic. Most importantly, he was good at his job. He turned Andrea’s life around when she was struggling with her dressing and survival in the Runway. So naturally, Nigel became the inspiration for Nigel. But wait, who’s gonna use it? Someone who doesn’t like wasting time but still likes to dress up — between productive, lazy, and/or workaholic. I quickly imagined a couple of personas who were most likely to use this app. Empathy Mapping Empathy Mapping — for better user understandingKey Features While brainstorming, ideas came gushing in. I wanted to keep it simple, rather than putting everything and making my life messier than my wardrobe. The idea was to keep the app effective and efficient. The key features were: Build your wardrobe Nigel assist/Changing room Move to/Remove from laundry Partywear Journey Map/Low-Fid Wireframes Now that I had more clarity on how I wanted Nigel to be, I laid out the flow of the app. To structure my ideas, I created low-fid wireframes and a journey map. Oh, and I used a really cool Figma plugin to make the wireframes. It was super quick and efficient. I could just drag and drop stuff in it. I used Overflow to make the journey map. Journey Map & Low-Fid WireframesVisualizing Nigel When the time came to give Nigel its identity, only a few keywords came to my mind: Minimal, Classy, Trustworthy, Poised, Calm, and Composed. Nigel’s IdentityColour Palette Colour PaletteTypography and Icon style Hi Nigel! What do I wear today? Nigel Assist This is a smart recommendation system that creates suitable patterns and combos based on your wardrobe and some intelligent factors. The factors are: Worn history Laundry status Microphone access to input compliments and ratings for a particular clothing/combo. (Imagine someone at work complimented you by saying, “Hey, nice shirt!”. With microphone access, Nigel will record this, and use the insight smartly to give you relevant suggestions). Styling trends Repeat patterns Nigel Assist and Hick’s Law Whenever you open your cupboard to get ready, you expose yourself to all the options you have at once, including clothes you wore 2 days ago(unless you keep yourself organized). This increases your reaction time. What is Hick’s Law? Hick’s law states that the more options there are to choose from, the longer it takes the user to make a decision on which one to interact with. Users bombarded with choices have to take time to interpret and decide, giving them work they don’t want. How did we implement it? Nigel only shows you 4 unique options every time you refresh the page. It excludes clothes that you wore recently or those which are in the laundry. This narrows down your search and decreases your reaction time. Swipe-able cardsNot satisfied with the options? — Go to the Changing Room You enter the changing room after tapping on a card. This feature helps if you’re still not satisfied with the suggestions. In the Changing Room, it lets you browse, but smartly! Nigel will never let you browse blindly and waste your time ????. Laundry Throwing your clothes in the laundry has never been more fun. Just drag and drop. You can empty it whenever you want. You only have to remember to do your laundry on time. Maybe Nigel can set a reminder for you? Hmmm… Drag and drop featureCards indicating laundry capacity. This will limit users from adding more clothes.…and more features like segregating your partywear from your regular wear. Nigel not only helps you decide what to wear on a daily basis, but it also helps you organize your wardrobe. So next time when you want to decide what to wear, you’ll already know what exactly to look for! Life is sorted, and so is your wardrobe ????. Go, give them butterflies! My name is Shantanu Sinha. I am a UX Designer from Mumbai, India. Spending less time deciding what to wear — a UX case study was originally published in UX Collective on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.